25 May 2018

 

Let Us Be Our Brothers & Sisters Keepers

"... itis a time we have to look and go beyond our ethnic lines and perceptions if we want to build a cohesive, united, harmonious and inclusive country in which all participate and feel proud to identify ourselves with it, as no other country we have but only South Sudan..."

By Ngor Arol Garang

I note with interest since the leaked tapes surfaced and became the public debate, with the government subsequently declaring Gen Paul Malong Awan “a rebel” to be closely monitored.
His response followed like a lightening thunder and warning of “appropriate and proportional forces” if these provocations continue unstopped, appear to send a clear message that would be a matter of time to see what he means. Either it means a decision to retire into silence where he would be treating anything he would be hearing and reading from the government as nothing but “total nonsense” or elect to announce rebellion and fight it out, so that the power of the most powerful manifest itself and the end game becomes the reality of the show.
Taking the latter, going into silence, to be more precise, which is one of the best options I advocate, because war is not a pleasurable game in my world, given that it brings misery, destruction and hopelessness, would not only be a demonstration of patriotism but another proof to the world that he has no intention to rebel, although it would be hard to rule out undetected underground politics this time.
I say undetected because he is aware he purchased a telecommunication device with surveillance and listening capability to track every conversation that takes place using South Sudan’s telecommunication system. The foreign hired experts and technicians in this particular area are working hard to justify their worth and the need for the government to continue to hire their services.
I understand they are getting praises and appreciative description of their skills, knowledge and expertise. Their pay bill will certainly be raised as part of motivational strategy to enhance monitoring and recording of all phone conversations in the country. So, telephone calls of suspicious personalities will not be roaming recording free communication zones.
The option then will be, if one has something to do with politics, buy satellite phones for well to do personalities with political issues or use WhatsApp, believed to have encryption capabilities to hack but which the foreign experts can equally manage to break through at exorbitant charges, leaving a face to face delivery of messages the only hundred per cent free means of communication.
But then the government being watchful of suspicious associations would not hesitate rounding up and taking the suspects for a free bill accommodation at blue house. So the sky (for spying) in Juba will be the limit.
All this is not what grabbed my attention. What grabbed my attention is what appears to be an emerging development in this saga. Despite Paul Malong having been the army chief of staff for a supposedly national army, commanding hundreds of thousands of officers and million soldiers from faces across the country, the debate about him appears not just depict an ethno-regional issue but scaling down to narrowing line, sadly Aweil, his area and down to his family and a few friends and relatives.
There are hardly measurable, if not negligible, voices from south Sudanese across the country partaking in the denial of the authenticity of the tapes. Does this not bother if you are an ethnic Dinka from Aweil?
Or is this an indication of majority approving the authenticity of the tape or insinuation of let them fight their war. They are the ones who brought the country to where it is today; to be allowed to fight so that it becomes a window of opportunity for change. This is, sadly, what I hear from other tribes?
While I am amused by such thinking, I think it is a time we have to look and go beyond our ethnic lines and perceptions if we want to build a cohesive, united, harmonious and inclusive country in which all participate and feel proud to identify ourselves with it, as no other country we have but only South Sudan to build into a prosperous, secure and stable nation. Let us all be our brother and sister’s keepers.
I am just amused, JacobJiel Akol. I saw it like you did after Malong’s removal.
 
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