Gen. Paul Malong Awan Is Doing A Large Scale Farming In South Sudan

....It is time for South Sudanese to put their differences aside and embark heavily, deeply and actively on agriculture to alleviate the suffering of the South Sudanese people.

Gen. Paul Malong Awan Practising Large Scale Farming In South Sudan
SPLA Chief Of General Staff, Gen. Paul Malong Awan Is Giving A Statement After Driving A Tractor In One Of His Farms In Aweil State

By Larko Lomayat 

On a two day visit to Aweil from Saturday, May 7, to Monday, May 9, 2016, the first time visit to Aweil State when Ambassador John Andruga Duku, crew from South Sudan Television (SSTV) and South Sudan Radio Service and myself were invited by the SPLA Chief of General Staff, Gen. Paul Malong Awan to accompany him to see his farms, I discovered that Gen. Paul Malong Awan is not only a soldier or one of SPLA soldiers who liberated South Sudan but a great farmer engaging in big scale farming in both areas of Malwal Kon in Aweil East State and Aweil in Aweil State at the moment.

South Sudan has the largest fertile agricultural land in Africa, and yet we South Sudanese for many years or from 2005 to date are importing food and agricultural produce from neighboring countries. Some people describe this attitude of bringing food from outside as laziness or we don’t know the value of agriculture which is the driving economy of each country.

In 2012, President Salva Kiir initiated a very good example of agriculture in South Sudan; that we South Sudanese by 2014 should be the bread basket for the entire Africa. In light of that the SPLA Chief of General Staff, Gen. Paul Malong Awan is also doing large scale farming in both Aweil East State and Aweil State and other areas in Bahr El-Ghazal region cultivating hundreds of fedans or acres. He also has a huge fruits garden.

It is known worldwide that South Sudan is rich in agricultural land and has one of the largest populations of pastoralists in the world.  However, since 1999, when Sudan first started exporting oil, agricultural production in the country has declined significantly.

The UN Food and Agriculture Agency (FAO) carried out an extensive satellite land cover survey that showed just 4.5 percent of the available land was under cultivation when South Sudan became independent.

South Sudan relies on food imports from neighboring countries, such as Uganda, Kenya and Sudan. These come at a high transportation cost which, coupled with inflation, has caused food prices to rise dramatically in South Sudan. The declining agricultural production and the reliance on expensive foreign food supplies have contributed to a severe food shortage in South Sudan.



It is time for South Sudanese to put their differences aside and embark heavily, deeply and actively on agriculture to alleviate the suffering of the South Sudanese people.
 

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