Changing Styles, Approaches And Attitudes In Building Peace In South Sudan

"... Fellow South Sudanese! What can I say and can I express myself better! To begin with..., where shall we buy diplomats, peacemakers, peace specialists or those with skills to restore peace and stability/tranquillity for us in our country?..."

Changing Styles, Approaches And Attitudes In Building Peace In South Sudan
A section of Eastern Equatoria youth members attending a two-day training by UNMISS at Safari Link Hotel, Torit [Photo| Peter Lokale]

By Peter Lokale Nakimangole

TORIT, 23 June 2016 [Gurtong] – Decades of civil wars fought alongside inter-communal clashes in South Sudan, have created wider vacuums in families and communities, causing thousands of people to flee their homes into neighbouring countries. As a result, traditional mechanisms for protection have continued to weaken further.

Now, with the latest IGAD brokered Compromise Peace Agreement, CPA, in which President Salva Kiir Mayardit and his Deputy Dr. Riek Machar Teny, have been tasked to implement a 39-Month Transitional Government of National Unity (TGoNU) in the country, chances are high and South Sudanese have expressed hopes that the country can restore stability and regain momentum of development initiatives.

Calling for strong support from the government and international agencies, women organisations in Imatong State have seen a great opportunity to contribute as they pledge commitment to taking the forefront in peace building campaigns and advocacy drive.

"... Fellow South Sudanese! What can I say and can I express myself better! To begin with..., where shall we buy diplomats, peacemakers, peace specialists or those with skills to restore peace and stability/tranquillity for us in our country? All we need is just to rethink and change our old attitudes. No one can come to design for us sustained peace in our own country. Even those people we think can come from other countries to fix our conflicts also have more similar problems shaking their nations. If they happen to get time to come, they would fully come committedly with adequate resources and time to spend here in our own country South Sudan," expresses a former teacher, Josphina Modi Alfredio who retired 4 years ago from active service.

She advises the youth to abandon violence as a means of addressing their grievances but instead to adopt a diplomatic approach to solve disputes.

Many South Sudanese have insisted that there is need to have an all-inclusive process to build peace is paramount and that it shouldn't be taken for granted.

"When we all irrespective of gender, disability, ethnic, social, political, economic background, are involved in processes that seek to find solutions to our problems, we will always feel we have done it ourselves and it is our own outcome and not someone else's. In this case, we South Sudanese people must work together and own our problems," expressed the former teacher.

A woman residing in Torit, Perina Lawino, is urging people in South Sudan to educate themselves on the contents of the peace agreement and educate themselves about peace building initiatives.

She strongly recommends that a need for women to be part of the peace process in South Sudan should be given a chance.

Democracy International (DI) through the Systems to Uphold the Credibility and Constitutionality of Elections in South Sudan (SUCCESS) Program concluded a series of briefings and dialogues on the peace agreement particularly the Agreement on Resolutions of Conflict in South Sudan (ARCISS) across Eastern Equatoria.
 

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