An open letter to General Omar Hassan Ahmed Al Bashir, President of The Republic of Sudan, Khartoum

The position of the people of the South Sudan, who had had bitter experiences, from the successive defunct regimes, did not have trust in the policies announced by your government.

Muortat, Aldo Ajou Deng, Dr. Zachariah Bol 

An open letter to General Omar Hassan Ahmed Al Bashir, President of The Republic of Sudan, Khartoum

Having been folowing up the affairs or our country as it moves towards rammification in the hands of those of you now holding power in Khartoum, concerned about the posssible failure to rescue this bleeding African giant from total collape; we the under signed sudanese leaders, have decided to addredd this open letter to you in the hope that, you will give it whole hearted attention, and take brave, drastic and urgent measure, in effort to rectify the sufferings of the people of the South Sudan.

For the reasons stated above;

Mr President,

We would like to draw your attention to the fact that, when you took over power from the elected government of Mr Sadig al Mahdi, in 1989, you announced, to the unsuspecting Sudanese people, in the name of allah, that you had come to power with a promise to rescue the country from the continuous political bickering; to reconcile all the Sudanese and bring a sustainable socio-economic development to the country.

You also vowed that, your government of the National Salvation Revolution, would work harder to find a solution that could bring to an end the war in the South Sudan, a war which has claimed millions of lives, much properties and shame in the eye of the civilised World.

Mr President,

Following your military take over, some Sudanese in the Northern Sudan, who believed in Islamic revivalism; immediately accepted you as an apostle of peace in the hope that you may hold true to your promise.

Mr President,

The position of the people of the South Sudan, who had had bitter experiences, from the successive defunct regimes, did not have trust in the policies announced by your government. Rather they were convinced that your government would do worst things to them, than the soldiers who came before you: (Ibrahim Abboud and Jaafar Nimeiri ).

Because of that obvious future uncertainty, many people from South Sudan joined the armed liberation struggle, a move that intensified the war, now in its twentieth year of blood letting and destruction to entire infrastructure in the South Sudan.

Mr president,

For fourteen painful years, your regime has been vaingloriously grappling with power and the war in the South. Despite the claim of successes, by your government, it has not been possible to turn the Sudan into Paradise as you initially promised.

Mr President,

The reasons for the difficulties faced by your government may have been due to the fact that your government embarked on complicated mechanisms of; Peace From Within and the Peace From Without processes you thought would bring peace to the South Sudan.

While the former mechanism was aimed at effort to neutralise the war by making it looked like a south-south war, the latter was apparently used to win the diplomatic war.

Mr President,

Despite the tragic fourteen years in which your government has been fighting a savage war in the South, of late, you have demonstrated to the South Sudanese people and the world at large that you have decided to deliver.

Mr President,

When your government signed the Machakos Protocol on July 20th, 2002, it was indeed welcome by the people of the South Sudan and by the international communities, who took it, a giant step in the right direction in the search for peace.

Your government was applauded, once again, when it took another bold step, against opposition within your own regime inner circle, and endorsed the Security Arrangements.

 

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