South Sudan Marks Peace Day

Hundreds of South Sudanese yesterday marched in the streets of Juba to mark January 9th as the day when the historic and expired Comprehensive Peace Agreement, (CPA) was signed in Nairobi in 2005.

South Sudan Marks Peace Day
Ayom Wol Dhal speaking to the press during the commemoration at the Dr. John Garang Mausoleum in Juba [©Gurtong]

By Waakhe Simon Wudu
JUBA, 10th January 2012 [Gurtong] - Hundreds of South Sudanese yesterday marched in the streets of Juba to mark January 9th as the day when the historic and expired Comprehensive Peace Agreement, (CPA) was signed in Nairobi in 2005.

This Day is commemorated yearly in remembrance of the CPA that ushered in a new peaceful era in the history of South Sudan after decades of civil war where 2.5million people were killed and over 4 million others displaced.

The event was organized by Concerned Citizens X, a newly established South Sudanese organization this year that aims to advocate for peace. The two-hour commemoration at the Dr. John Garang Mausoleum advocated for continued fight to restore peace in the new country.

While delivering her message to South Sudanese, the spokesperson of the Concerned Citizen X, Ms. Ayom Wol Dhal said that, all South Sudanese are reminded to shun tribalism and violence.

Ayom explained that letter ‘X” advocates for the citizens to identify themselves as “South Sudanese” irrespective of their names and tribes. “X stands for 'don’t ask my name and tribe', I am a South Sudanese,” Ayom explained.

“Today as you celebrate the peace day, remind everyone to wear white garments im memory of the victims of violence in our country. We should stop violence and killing ourselves,” she added.

The activist also called for the citizens to start instilling and developing the character of independency. “We want to urge all South Sudanese to address their problems instead of waiting for assistance from the United Nations, and donors,” Ayom challenged her countrymen.

Meanwhile, in face to face interview conducted by Gurtong with different speakers; most women and youths who attended the function advocated for the fight against violence in South Sudan.

“We voted for independence in order to be peaceful, it’s very shameful that we who voted for freedom resort to killing our children and women. We need to make peace,” Tabishi Nyekini one of the women spoke to Gurtong at the mausoleum.

Peter Atem, a youth activist outlined poverty and politics to be the root cause of the current killings and insecurity in the country. He called for unity and fight against poverty to bring peace in the newest nation.

“Poverty is the root cause of the peace instability. There is no food, no roads and everybody struggles to have for food and wealth daily. I want to tell the youths that it is our responsibility to maintain peace. The Government provides security and youths keep peace,” Atem said.
 
“Politicians only stay in Juba, I want all of us to go to the States and speak to the people and address their problems,” Atem added.

“As South Sudanese, we need to come together. Whether you are in Nimule, Wau Kajokeji, Rumbek, Upper Nile you are a South Sudanese. We have to stop tribalism and violence,” he said.

South Sudan gained her independence last year on 9th July. Over 99% of the citizens voted for secession in an undoubted hope for restoration of total peace, freedom and an end to marginalization by the Sudanese government in Khartoum.

However, despite the Government of South Sudan’s effort to prioritize security, insecurity has remained the greatest threat since independence, halting development progress in the new nation.

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